Respectful and Supportive Place to Work and Learn (RASP) workshop feedback and next steps

Many thanks again to our colleagues in the Centre for Equity and Inclusion for facilitating our workshop on March 4.  Thanks also to all attendees who made time to attend and who contributed to the collective learning experience. 

As a follow-up to the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) – Respectful and Supportive Place to Work and Learn (RASP) workshop, a satisfaction survey was distributed to the more than 100 attendees. Of those who attended, 39 responded. The survey results have been analyzed and a brief overall summary is provided below.

The results indicate attendees were generally satisfied with the session, with 82 per cent of survey respondents answering they were very or somewhat satisfied. Only 2.5 per cent of respondents (1 respondent) indicated they were very dissatisfied. 

In terms of the information value of the workshop, 77 per cent of respondents answered that they found the sessions to be very to extremely informative, with only 5 per cent of respondents (two in total) indicating the sessions were not informative.

The PSB leadership team, in consultation with our community, will continue to work with internal partners such as CTL and Inclusive Communities to identify and plan future sessions based on those suggested in the survey. 

Approximately 85 per cent of survey respondents indicated they would recommend this learning session to their colleagues and others, while 89 per cent indicated they will use the skills and knowledge learned in the workshop in their practice.

When asked to rate their knowledge after the training, survey respondents identified improvement in understanding of Sheridan’s EDI-related policies and procedures, roles and responsibilities of all parties related to accessibility, discrimination and harassment, sexual violence, service animals and reporting of issues or inquiries. 

While a few respondents indicated the training did not meet their expectations, others said the training workshop was “great and informative,” or “well done.”  When asked to share three important highlights from the workshop, a cross-section of responses included: references to the importance of empathy, safety and listening competencies as important requirements in EDI-related matters; the importance of including such training and information for new staff and faculty as part of an onboarding process; and how helpful it was to meet and learn more about subject matter experts and become familiar with information, policies and procedures. 

When asked about other EDI related topics and/or workshops, respondents indicated a variety of suggestions including (but not limited to): support for international learners, mental health resources and support for learners, EDI-related workshops to cover more workplace faculty-to-faculty relationships and employee-to-employee relationships and how to embed EDI into curriculum, to name a few. Community members are encouraged to share additional thoughts, ideas and suggestions for further development opportunities in this important space.

As part of next steps, the PSB leadership team, in consultation with our community, will continue to work with internal partners such as CTL and Inclusive Communities to identify and plan future sessions based on those suggested in the survey. 

Should faculty or staff have any questions or concerns related to EDI matters, please feel free to reach out to your respective associate dean or manager and refer to the Centre for Equity and Inclusion , the Office of Inclusive Communities for additional information, tips and guides, inclusive communities webinars and resources. 

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